What Additional Precautions Should Be Taken?

When should standard precautions be used?

Healthcare workers must use standard precautions: when caring for all patients, regardless of the patient’s perceived or actual infectious status.

when handling blood and/or all other body substances, secretions and excretions (excluding sweat), non-intact skin or mucous membranes..

What is standard infection control precautions?

Infection control principles and practices for local health agencies. Standard Precautions. Standard precautions are a set of infection control practices used to prevent transmission of diseases that can be acquired by contact with blood, body fluids, non-intact skin (including rashes), and mucous membranes.

What are the 4 main universal precautions?

Standard Precautions apply to 1) blood; 2) all body fluids, secretions, and excretions, except sweat, regardless of whether or not they contain visible blood; 3) non-intact skin; and 4) mucous membranes.

What diseases are airborne precautions?

Diseases requiring airborne precautions include, but are not limited to: Measles, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Varicella (chickenpox), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Airborne precautions apply to patients known or suspected to be infected with microorganisms transmitted by airborne droplet nuclei.

When should you apply additional or transmission based precautions?

Transmission-Based Precautions are the second tier of basic infection control and are to be used in addition to Standard Precautions for patients who may be infected or colonized with certain infectious agents for which additional precautions are needed to prevent infection transmission.

What are the 9 key areas that define standard precautions?

8.1 Standard precautionshand hygiene and cough etiquette.the use of personal protective equipment (PPE)the safe use and disposal of sharps.routine environmental cleaning.incorporation of safe practices for handling blood, body fluids and secretions as well as excretions [91].

What are the two basic goals of infection control?

The two basic goals of infection control are to protect the patient and health care personnel from infection. Infection control starts with standard precautions. Standard precautions are the methods recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for preventing the transmission of infections.

What are 3 types of isolation precautions?

There are three types of transmission-based precautions–contact, droplet, and airborne – the type used depends on the mode of transmission of a specific disease.

What are the 3 types of transmission based precautions?

There are three categories of Transmission-Based Precautions: Contact Precautions, Droplet Precautions, and Airborne Precautions.

What are some diseases that can be spread through the air?

Many common infections can spread by airborne transmission at least in some cases, including but not limited to: COVID-19; measles morbillivirus, chickenpox virus; Mycobacterium tuberculosis, influenza virus, enterovirus, norovirus and less commonly coronavirus, adenovirus, and possibly respiratory syncytial virus.

When would you use standard precautions over sterile precautions?

Standard precautions are the basic level of infection control that should be used in the care of all patients all of the time. Use standard precautions in the care of all patients to reduce the risk of transmission of microorganisms from both recognized and non-recognized sources of infection.

What disease requires contact precautions?

Illnesses requiring contact precautions may include, but are not limited to: presence of stool incontinence (may include patients with norovirus, rotavirus, or Clostridium difficile), draining wounds, uncontrolled secretions, pressure ulcers, presence of generalized rash, or presence of ostomy tubes and/or bags …

What are additional precautions and when should they be used what additional precautions should be taken?

Additional Precautions are based on the mode of transmission of the causative organism. Additional Precautions are used as an adjunct to Routine Practices when microorganisms are: Highly infectious • Known to create severe disease • Difficult to treat (antibiotic resistant).

What is the difference between standard precautions and additional precautions?

Standard precautions describe the routine work practices recommended for use with all patients to give the minimum level of protection for everyone (patients, workers and others). Additional precautions set a higher standard of infection control.

What are the 5 standard precautions for infection control?

Standard PrecautionsHand hygiene.Use of personal protective equipment (e.g., gloves, masks, eyewear).Respiratory hygiene / cough etiquette.Sharps safety (engineering and work practice controls).Safe injection practices (i.e., aseptic technique for parenteral medications).Sterile instruments and devices.More items…

What are the 3 methods of infection control?

There are three types of transmission-based precautions: contact, droplet, and airborne. Contact precautions are used in addition to standard precautions when caring for patients with known or suspected diseases that are spread by direct or indirect contact.

What are the three basic elements of airborne precautions?

Airborne precautions consist of a three-level hierarchy of (1) administrative controls, (2) environmental controls, and (3) respiratory-protection controls.

What are additional precautions?

Additional Precautions are infection prevention and control precautions and practices required in addition to Routine Practices. They are based on the mode (means) of transmission of the infectious agent: airborne, droplet, and contact.